Primate And Wildlife Safari

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Safari Overview

Pick from your hotel In Kampala and drive south westwards stopping at the Mpigi Drum Makers where you will watch the ceremonial drums being crafted using methods passed down through generations you will

Full Itinerary

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP) is in south-western Uganda. The park is part of the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest and is situated along the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) border next to the Virunga National Park and on the edge of the Albertine Rift. Composed of 331 square kilometres (128 sq mi) of both montane and lowland forest, it is accessible only on foot. BINP is a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization-designated World Heritage Site.

Species diversity is a feature of the park.[3] It provides habitat for 120 species of mammals, 348 species of birds, 220 species of butterflies, 27 species of frogs, chameleons, geckos, and many endangered species. Floristically, the park is among the most diverse forests in East Africa, with more than 1,000 flowering plant species, including 163 species of trees and 104 species of ferns. The northern (low elevation) sector has many species of Guineo-Congolian flora, including two endangered species, the brown mahogany and Brazzeia longipedicellata. In particular, the area shares in the high levels of endemisms of the Albertine Rift.

The park is a sanctuary for colobus monkeys, chimpanzees, and many birds such as hornbills and turacos. It is most notable for the 400 Bwindi gorillas, half of the world's population of the critically endangered mountain gorillas. 14 habituated mountain gorilla groups are open to tourism in four different sectors of Buhoma, Ruhijja, Rushaga and the Nkuringo all under the management of Uganda Wildlife Authority.

The park is inhabited by about 340 individual mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), known as the Bwindi population, which makes up almost half of all the mountain gorillas in the world. The rest of the worldwide mountain gorilla population is in the nearby Virunga Mountains. A 2006 census of the mountain gorilla population in the park showed that its numbers had increased modestly from an estimated 300 individuals in 1997[19] to 320 individuals in 2002 to 340 individuals in 2006.[18] Disease and habitat loss are the greatest threat to the gorillas. Poaching is also a threat.[20] Research on the Bwindi population lags behind that of the Virunga National Park population, but some preliminary research on the Bwindi gorilla population has been carried out by Craig Stanford.

This research has shown that the Bwindi gorilla's diet is markedly higher in fruit than that of the Virunga population, and that the Bwindi gorillas, even silverbacks, are more likely to climb trees to feed on foliage, fruits, and epiphytes. In some months, the Bwindi gorilla diet is very similar to that of Bwindi chimpanzees. It was also found that Bwindi gorillas travel farther per day than Virunga gorillas, particularly on days when feeding primarily on fruit than when they are feeding on fibrous foods. Additionally, Bwindi gorillas are much more likely to build their nests in trees, nearly always in Alchornea floribunda (locally, "Echizogwa"), a small understory tree. Mountain gorillas are an endangered species, with an estimated total population of about 650 individuals.

There are no mountain gorillas in captivity. In the 1960s and 1970s, mountain gorillas were captured to begin a population of them in captive facilities. No baby gorillas survived in captivity, and no mountain gorillas are known of that are currently in captivity.

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP) is in south-western Uganda. The park is part of the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest and is situated along the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) border next to the Virunga National Park and on the edge of the Albertine Rift. Composed of 331 square kilometres (128 sq mi) of both montane and lowland forest, it is accessible only on foot. BINP is a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization-designated World Heritage Site.

Species diversity is a feature of the park.[3] It provides habitat for 120 species of mammals, 348 species of birds, 220 species of butterflies, 27 species of frogs, chameleons, geckos, and many endangered species. Floristically, the park is among the most diverse forests in East Africa, with more than 1,000 flowering plant species, including 163 species of trees and 104 species of ferns. The northern (low elevation) sector has many species of Guineo-Congolian flora, including two endangered species, the brown mahogany and Brazzeia longipedicellata. In particular, the area shares in the high levels of endemisms of the Albertine Rift.

The park is a sanctuary for colobus monkeys, chimpanzees, and many birds such as hornbills and turacos. It is most notable for the 400 Bwindi gorillas, half of the world's population of the critically endangered mountain gorillas. 14 habituated mountain gorilla groups are open to tourism in four different sectors of Buhoma, Ruhijja, Rushaga and the Nkuringo all under the management of Uganda Wildlife Authority.

The park is inhabited by about 340 individual mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), known as the Bwindi population, which makes up almost half of all the mountain gorillas in the world. The rest of the worldwide mountain gorilla population is in the nearby Virunga Mountains. A 2006 census of the mountain gorilla population in the park showed that its numbers had increased modestly from an estimated 300 individuals in 1997[19] to 320 individuals in 2002 to 340 individuals in 2006.[18] Disease and habitat loss are the greatest threat to the gorillas. Poaching is also a threat.[20] Research on the Bwindi population lags behind that of the Virunga National Park population, but some preliminary research on the Bwindi gorilla population has been carried out by Craig Stanford.

This research has shown that the Bwindi gorilla's diet is markedly higher in fruit than that of the Virunga population, and that the Bwindi gorillas, even silverbacks, are more likely to climb trees to feed on foliage, fruits, and epiphytes. In some months, the Bwindi gorilla diet is very similar to that of Bwindi chimpanzees. It was also found that Bwindi gorillas travel farther per day than Virunga gorillas, particularly on days when feeding primarily on fruit than when they are feeding on fibrous foods. Additionally, Bwindi gorillas are much more likely to build their nests in trees, nearly always in Alchornea floribunda (locally, "Echizogwa"), a small understory tree. Mountain gorillas are an endangered species, with an estimated total population of about 650 individuals.

There are no mountain gorillas in captivity. In the 1960s and 1970s, mountain gorillas were captured to begin a population of them in captive facilities. No baby gorillas survived in captivity, and no mountain gorillas are known of that are currently in captivity.

Queen Elizabeth National Park occupies an estimated 1,978 square kilometres (764 sq mi).[4] The park extends from Lake George in the north-east to Lake Edward in the south-west and includes the Kazinga Channel connecting the two lakes.

The park was founded in 1952 as Kazinga National Park. It was renamed two years later to commemorate a visit by Queen Elizabeth II.

Queen Elizabeth National Park is known for its wildlife, including African buffalo, Ugandan kob, hippopotamus, Nile crocodile, African bush elephant, African leopard, lion, and chimpanzee. It is home to 95 mammal species and over 500 bird species. The area around Ishasha in Rukungiri District is famous for its tree-climbing lions, whose males sport black manes.[6] Poachers killed six elephants in the park in 2015, triggering both anger and frustration within the Ugandan conservation community.

Queen Elizabeth National Park together with the adjacent Virunga National Park is a Lion Conservation Unit.[8] The area is considered a potential lion stronghold in Central Africa, if poaching is curbed and prey species recover.

The park is also famous for its volcanic features, including volcanic cones and deep craters, many with crater lakes, such as the Katwe craters, from which salt is extracted.

Services in the park include a telecenter run by Conservation Through Public Health and the Uganda Wildlife Authority, neighboring the Queen's Pavilion, park lodges, game and scenic drives, and boat launches.

Queen Elizabeth National Park occupies an estimated 1,978 square kilometres (764 sq mi).[4] The park extends from Lake George in the north-east to Lake Edward in the south-west and includes the Kazinga Channel connecting the two lakes.

The park was founded in 1952 as Kazinga National Park. It was renamed two years later to commemorate a visit by Queen Elizabeth II.

Queen Elizabeth National Park is known for its wildlife, including African buffalo, Ugandan kob, hippopotamus, Nile crocodile, African bush elephant, African leopard, lion, and chimpanzee. It is home to 95 mammal species and over 500 bird species. The area around Ishasha in Rukungiri District is famous for its tree-climbing lions, whose males sport black manes.[6] Poachers killed six elephants in the park in 2015, triggering both anger and frustration within the Ugandan conservation community.

Queen Elizabeth National Park together with the adjacent Virunga National Park is a Lion Conservation Unit.[8] The area is considered a potential lion stronghold in Central Africa, if poaching is curbed and prey species recover.

The park is also famous for its volcanic features, including volcanic cones and deep craters, many with crater lakes, such as the Katwe craters, from which salt is extracted.

Services in the park include a telecenter run by Conservation Through Public Health and the Uganda Wildlife Authority, neighboring the Queen's Pavilion, park lodges, game and scenic drives, and boat launches.

Have an early morning breakfast and quickly swing in action for chimpanzee tracking, deep into the forest.

Return to the lodge for lunch and later launch a swamp walking expedition through the Bigodi area of swamps and papyrus, in search for bird species including:

  • White-spotted Flufftail,
  • Blue-headed Coucal,
  • Blue-breasted Kingfisher,
  • Yellow-billed Barbet,
  • Scaly-throated Honey guide,
  • Scaly-breasted Illadopsis,
  • Blue-shouldered 
  • Snowy-headed Robin-Chats,
  • Black-faced Rufous Warbler
  • The Great Blue Turacos

ABOUT KIBALE FOREST NATIONAL PARK

The park is composed of permanent rain forest representing a fascinating diversity of animals and boosts the highest concentration of the endangered chimpanzees across Africa. It is therefore the best destination across Africa for Chimpanzee tracking and chimpanzee habituation.

 
Other animals on the check list may include:
  • Red colobus monkey,
  • Black and white colobus monkey,
  • Blue monkey
  • Grey-cheeked mangabey,
  • Red tailed monkey,
  • Bush babies 
  • Pottos
  • Elephants,
  • forest buffaloes,
  • bush pigs.

...as well as over 325 bird species and counts of butterfly species and a total number of 250 tree species are recorded.

Have an early morning breakfast and quickly swing in action for chimpanzee tracking, deep into the forest.

Return to the lodge for lunch and later launch a swamp walking expedition through the Bigodi area of swamps and papyrus, in search for bird species including:

  • White-spotted Flufftail,
  • Blue-headed Coucal,
  • Blue-breasted Kingfisher,
  • Yellow-billed Barbet,
  • Scaly-throated Honey guide,
  • Scaly-breasted Illadopsis,
  • Blue-shouldered 
  • Snowy-headed Robin-Chats,
  • Black-faced Rufous Warbler
  • The Great Blue Turacos

ABOUT KIBALE FOREST NATIONAL PARK

The park is composed of permanent rain forest representing a fascinating diversity of animals and boosts the highest concentration of the endangered chimpanzees across Africa. It is therefore the best destination across Africa for Chimpanzee tracking and chimpanzee habituation.

 
Other animals on the check list may include:
  • Red colobus monkey,
  • Black and white colobus monkey,
  • Blue monkey
  • Grey-cheeked mangabey,
  • Red tailed monkey,
  • Bush babies 
  • Pottos
  • Elephants,
  • forest buffaloes,
  • bush pigs.

...as well as over 325 bird species and counts of butterfly species and a total number of 250 tree species are recorded.

Kampala is the capital and largest city of Uganda.

The city is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning:

  • Kampala Central Division,
  • Kawempe Division,
  • Makindye Division,
  • Nakawa Division, and Rubaga Division.

Surrounding Kampala is the rapidly growing Wakiso District, whose population more than doubled between 2002 and 2014 and now stands at over 2 million.

Kampala was named the 13th fastest growing city on the planet, with an annual population growth rate of 4.03 percent by City Mayors and has been ranked the best city to live in East Africa ahead of Nairobi and Kigali by Mercer, a global development consulting agency based in New York City.

Safari Inclusions  

All activities in the Itinerary, transport and accommodation.



Safari Exclusions  

Personal expenses.

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